Author Spotlight: Tricia Drammeh

Bio: Tricia Drammeh is a wife and mother of four children who lives in New Hampshire. Her published works include The Seance, The Claiming Words and The Fifth Circle. She is currently working on her seventh novel. When Tricia isn’t writing, she can be found devouring books, interviewing up-and-coming authors, and drinking vast amounts of coffee.

Interview:

What all have you written? Include everything: The first book I wrote and published was The Claiming Words, the first book in a YA fantasy/paranormal series about two girls who become entangled in magic when a new family moves to town. I’ve also written The Séance, a YA horror novel about a girl who performs a séance and accidentally summons a demon. The Fifth Circle is a stand-alone novel geared toward older teens.

Where can we buy or see them?: Links to my books can be found on my website: http://www.triciadrammeh.com/ or on my Amazon page: http://www.amazon.com/Tricia-Drammeh/e/B008UI2CE6/

Tell us a little bit about your main character: The main character in The Séance is Abby, a freshman in high school who is obsessed with the paranormal. She convinces herself she knows how to perform a séance, but after she accidentally summons a demon who makes her life hell, she realizes she doesn’t know as much as she thought.

What are you working on at the minute?: I’m currently working on a modern-day, YA Romeo and Juliet.

What is it about?: It’s about a love at first sight relationship. The two main characters are cast in the leading roles in Romeo and Juliet in their high school play, but their real lives also have some similarities to the play they’re performing in. “Romeo” has a tarnished past that everyone knows about, but “Juliet” has a secret that threatens to destroy both of them.

What genre are your books?: My books are usually paranormal or mainstream fiction aimed toward the YA or NA audience.

What draws you to this genre?: I love paranormal books. It’s my favorite genre to read. I think I first fell in love with paranormal novels when I read Anne Rice years and years ago.

Do you have to do research for your books?: For The Fifth Circle, I had to re-read Dante’s Divine Comedy. I also had to do a bit of research on mental illness and the criminal justice system. Right now, I’m re-reading Romeo and Juliet.

When did you decide to become a writer?: I’ve always dreamed of becoming a writer, but I didn’t write my first book until I was almost forty years old. I sat down and just began writing one day and I was hooked.

Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day?: Not really. There are times I’ll buckle down and set solid word count goals, but I tend to be a slacker.

Do you work on an outline or plot before you start writing?: Never. I usually write until I flesh out the characters. From there, I let the characters form the story. I usually outline as I go and never know how the book will end until I’m pretty far into it.

What is the hardest thing about writing?: The hardest part used to be finding the time to write. Now I have trouble getting into the zone and maintaining my momentum. There are lots of distractions and I am easily distracted.

What is the easiest thing about writing?: Editing. I enjoy the process of editing, rewriting, and proofreading.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?: It depends. The Claiming Words and The Séance were written in about two months, but The Fifth Circle took me nearly a year.

Do you edit your book right after you finish or let it sit for awhile?: I let them sit, sometimes for six months or more.

How are you publishing this book and why?: The Claiming Words series was contracted to a publisher, but I’ve self published my other books. I definitely plan to self publish future books because most authors have to do their own promotion, which is the hardest part of being an author. Unless I can find a publisher who not only promises to market, but also has the ability to do so, I don’t think it’s worth giving up such a huge percentage of royalties to a publisher.

How do you market your books?: I’m not very good at marketing, and over the past several months, I haven’t done much marketing at all. In addition to doing the usual—Facebook page, website, blog, Twitter—I’ve also done a few blog tours.

What do you do to get book reviews?: Reviews have come from blog tours or free promotions.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?: Don’t let anyone tell you how to be a writer. There’s lots of advice out there. Some of it’s good. Some of it will make you second guess yourself. Be fearless and trust your own instincts. Above all, write.

Website: http://www.triciadrammeh.com/

Blog: http://blog.triciadrammeh.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorTriciaDrammeh

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TriciaDrammeh

Lnkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/tricia-drammeh/56/7b9/139

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/triciadrammeh/

I would like to thank Tricia for her time in completing the interview. I plan on reading at least one of her books and posting a review in the near future.

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6 thoughts on “Author Spotlight: Tricia Drammeh

  1. Great interview! Tricia has always had the most amazing talent at putting her fantasies into irresistible stories. She is one of my favorite people because the magical three-year-old in her speaks and writes with adult(ish) words.

  2. Pingback: Teaser Tuesday: The Seance by Tricia Drammeh | Melissa Janda – A Time to Write

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